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In Times of Bereavement

 You may find the following leaflet helpful

What to do after a Death in Scotland; Practical Advice for Times of Bereavement

If someone dies at home

1. Telephone the doctor who will visit to confirm that death has taken place.

If death occurs during the night and is sudden and unexpected, the doctor should be notified at once.  Otherwise you can call the doctor in the morning. The doctor will: either issue a medical certificate of cause of death (Form 11) needed by the registrar, provided that there are no unusual circumstances or in some cases, report the death to the Procurator Fiscal.  Some Medical Certificates of Causes of Death are randomly audited to ensure that an accurate description of the causes of death has been recorded, to ensure that the processes around death certification are robust and have appropriate safeguards in place, and to provide better quality information about causes of death so that health services can be better prepared for the future.  This is an audit performed by the Death Certification Review Service. It means that sometimes the issuing of a death certificate can be delayed by a few days, because it has been randomly selected for audit,  but we will aim to issue the certificate as soon as possible.

2. Contact a funeral director.

3. Arrange to collect the doctor's Medical Certificate of Death (usually from the surgery).

4. Make an appointment with the Registrar at the Registrar's Office. You will need to have the Death Certificate before you can do this.

Take this to the Registrars Office, (together with the deceased's Medical Card and Birth Certificate, if available) for the area in which the death took place.  Alternatively you can register by declaration at any convenient Registrars Office but certificates will not be available as these will have to be posted to you a few days later.  The Registrar will normally issue a Green coloured certificate for you to give to your funeral director who will look after necessary arrangements for the funeral.  The Registrar will also issue a white notification certificate for the DSS. They will also enquire as to the number of Certified Copies you require for dealing with the deceased finances (a fee is payable for each copy).

If someone dies in hospital

The hospital will: either issue a medical certificate of cause of death (Form 11) needed by the registrar, provided the cause of death is quite clear.  The hospital staff may ask you to consider authorising a post-mortem examination if that would provide valuable information about the person's final illness or treatment which could help other people or in some cases, report the death to the Procurator Fiscal.  Should you wish more information about hospital post-mortem examination, leaflets are available from the hospital.

2. Contact a funeral director.

3. Arrange to collect the doctor's Medical Certificate of Death (this will be from the hospital).

4. Make an appointment with the Registrar at the Registrar's Office. You will need to have the Death Certificate before you can do this.

Take this to the Registrars Office, (together with the deceased's Medical Card and Birth Certificate, if available) for the area in which the death took place.  Alternatively you can register by declaration at any convenient Registrars Office but certificates will not be available as these will have to be posted to you a few days later.  The Registrar will normally issue a Green coloured certificate for you to give to your funeral director who will look after necessary arrangements for the funeral.  The Registrar will also issue a white notification certificate for the DSS. They will also enquire as to the number of Certified Copies you require for dealing with the deceased finances (a fee is payable for each copy).



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